English 100 essay examples regents critical lens

His own natural feeling of his own distress, his own natural view of his own situation, presses hard upon him, and he cannot, without a very great effort, fix his attention upon that of the impartial spectator. Observe what difficulty a portrait painter finds, in getting the person who sits for his picture to present to him precisely that view of the countenance from which the first outline was drawn. When we are gay and cheerful, its motion is brisker and more lively, our thoughts succeed one another more rapidly, and those which immediately follow one another seem frequently either to have but little connection, or to be connected rather by their opposition than by their mutual resemblance. Why does he not, in like manner, pick a quarrel with that celebrated monument in the _Pere la Chaise_, brought there ‘From Paraclete’s white walls and silver springs;’ or why does he not leave a lampoon, instead of an elegy, on Laura’s tomb? I trust that I have made it clear that the librarian of day-before-yesterday is not a bad librarian. It is characteristic that on embarking as a subaltern for Egypt he wrote enthusiastically: I do not suppose that any expedition since the days of Roman governors of provinces has started with such magnificence; we might have been Antony going to Egypt in a purple-sailed galley. His refusal to do this was a crime, so that if his answers were unsatisfactory to the judge the latter could punish him english 100 essay examples regents critical lens on the spot for contumacy. It is the well-known story that when Richard C?ur de Lion hastened to the funeral of his father, Henry II., and met the procession at Fontevraud, the blood poured from the nostrils of the dead king, whose end he had hastened by his rebellion and disobedience.[1140] Although it never seems to have formed part of English jurisprudence, its vitality in the popular mind is shown in Shakespeare’s Richard III., where Gloster interrupts the obsequies of Henry VI. A squad of soldiers marching out of time, or out of line, is a recognised stimulus to laughter. They are affected by things in a different manner from us, not in a different degree; and a mutual understanding is hopeless. i. would you suspend all the natural and private affections on the mere logical deductions of the Understanding, and exenterate the former of all the force, tenderness, and constancy they derive from habit, local nearness or immediate sympathy, because the last are contrary to the speculative reason of the thing? For some months we published a weekly newspaper of considerable interest. We go to him as pupils, not as partisans. These signs may well make the friend of laughter sad. Then would come the separate question as to whether this community of traits has a genetic explanation or not. Again, a blind man shews a prodigious sagacity in hearing and almost _feeling_ objects at a distance from him. The preceding case, I consider, is one of these examples. But no one ever suspected Mr. He denies that there is linguistic evidence of any such theory. Again: _Oio_, to catch. The presence of the expert in a gathering of bucolics is a situation pregnant with possibilities of mirthful enjoyment. There seem to be many cases of the laughable, for example, amusing vices, absences of mind, and all irrelevances which bring in the solemn where it is out of place, where that which is expressed is a mood the very opposite of the playful. But if there is not a specific faculty and organ for every act of the mind and object in nature, then Dr. Is all the rest to be dissolved as an empty delusion, by the potent spell of unsparing philosophy? When it is proposed to make some change or other, I constantly hear english 100 essay examples regents critical lens the objection, “That wouldn’t result at all as you expect; it would do so-and-so.” But why not try it? The body may be so hard, that our strength is not sufficient to break it; we still suppose, however, that if a sufficient force were applied, it might be so broken; and, at any rate, we can always, in fancy at least, imagine it to be divided into two or more parts. As the purpose of the latter is to make money, wants are regarded rather than needs. The falsity of the accusation and the sanctity of the victim were manifested by the uninterrupted growth of his hair and nails and the constant flowing of blood from a wound, while the dead tree suddenly put forth leaves and flowers. Thus, too, ought we to conceive with regard to ourselves. There is a soft _th_ which the German ear could not catch, and a _kth_ which was equally difficult, both of frequent occurrence. Every idea turns off to something else, or back upon itself; there is no progress made, no blind impulse, no accumulation of imagination with circumstances, no absorption of all other feelings in one overwhelming one, that is, no keeping, no _momentum_, no integrity, no totality, no inflexible sincerity of purpose, and it is this resolution of the sentiments into their detached points and first impressions, so that they do not take an entire and involuntary hold of them, but either they can throw them off from their lightness, or escape from them by reason of their minuteness, that we English complain of as French nature or a want of nature, for by nature is only meant that the mind identifies itself with something so as to be no longer master of itself, and the French mind never identifies itself with any thing, but always has its own consciousness, its own affectation, its own gratification, its own slippery inconstancy or impertinent prolixity interposed between the object and the impression. The tribal and totemic divisions are barely remembered, and the ancient prohibitions about endogamous marriage have fallen completely into desuetude. I shall not trouble the Reader with their names, because I wou’d not be thought so vain, as to rank my self among ’em; and their names are already too well known, and celebrated to receive any additional Lustre from so weak Encomiums as mine. But the advantages are not all on the side of the direct personal contact, as the correspondence schools have been astute enough to find out. Of late they have published in several of our large cities lists of books in the public library written by their coreligionists, or, for some reason of special interest to them. It was only a question of time when this opinion should triumph, and the first quarter of the eighteenth century probably witnessed the disappearance of this survival of medi?valism from recognized judicial procedure.[1171] CHAPTER XII. They lie like hoar frost in the sun on his surroundings, on which he unwittingly casts a reflection of the habits of his mind and of the directions of his taste; as when in a large town bizarre juxtapositions of the vulgar heroic strike the observer’s eye in the names of streets, or of loose engines on a railway. As a last example we may take a porcine obstinacy over against the expression of others’ wishes, the stupidity against which even “the gods contend in vain,” a variety of the amusing which seems to tickle our sensibilities by presenting to us the rigidity of the machine in lieu of the reasonably pliant organism of the man. What his genius required, and what it sadly lacked, was a framework of accepted and traditional ideas which would have prevented him from indulging in a philosophy of his own, and concentrated his attention upon the problems of the poet. He himself evidently had a strong possession of his subject, a thorough conviction, an intense interest; and this communicated itself from his _manner_, from the tones of his voice, from his commanding attitudes, and eager gestures, instinctively and unavoidably to his hearers. When he lays his hand upon his foot, as his hand feels the pressure or resistance of his foot, so his foot feels that of his hand. Whether the success was due to Euripides is uncertain; whether it was due to Professor Murray is not proved; but that it was in considerable measure due to Miss Thorndyke there is no doubt. No nation has yet been discovered so uncivilized as to be altogether without them. Many curious privileges and customs the lords of the manor derived in those days—for we find in 33rd of Edward the 1st, 1305, William le Parker was entituled to receive wreck of sea, lagan, and resting geld, customs, and other profits upon the sea and land, and of every crew of a ship or boat washing their nets in the said village after Michaelmas to Martlemas, an hundred herrings, and also a fee for goods, chattels, &c., coming to land by sea, without the help of the said William or his servant, or resting upon the land one day and one night; and if the said William or his men, &c., immediately after imminent danger, or after shipwreck, shall do their endeavour to save such things, then the said William shall have a third part of all such things, or the value of them, unless of his good will he will omit something, but must not be asked.—Among the land customs was the bed gild, and at every wedding, noble or ignoble, the lords of the manor had the privilege of consummating the nuptials of the bride, or receiving a fee instead. The spectacle of a child wearing a man’s hat, fully considered above, shows us the laughable directly and unmistakably as a juxtaposition of two foreign elements, the semblance of a whole made up of incongruous parts. The earlier portions of the essay are devoted chiefly to an examination of moral ideas, the latter portions more exclusively to the facts of nature and of mind from which they derive their meaning. Better than both is the opportunity for free investigation with enlightened guidance. The principles are the same in all nature; and we understand them better, as we verify them by experience and practice. One, who is really anxious to do his duty, must be very weak, if he can imagine that he has much occasion for them; and with regard to one who is negligent of it, the very style of those writings is not such as is likely to awaken him to more attention. We not only approve, therefore, but in some measure admire his conduct, and think it worthy of a considerable degree of applause. Or how by means of sight would he know it to be _his_ thigh, more than it was? Yet when he succeeds in rousing in us the mingled emotions of fear and horror on which so many of his effects depend he is using for his purposes what was once a defensive mechanism of the human organism, causing it to shrink from and avoid the real things–wild beasts, enemies, the forces of nature–that were striving continually to overwhelm and destroy it. It is the mere natural ebullition of passion, urged nearly to madness, and that will admit no other cause of dire misfortune but its own, which swallows up all other griefs. In one sense we are said to do justice to our neighbour when we abstain from doing him any positive harm, and do not directly hurt him, either in his person, or in his estate, or in his reputation. Whibley’s remark that: George Wyndham was by character and training a romantic.

Each sovereign, expecting {203} little justice from his neighbours, is disposed to treat them with as little as he expects from them. I had hitherto read only in school-books, and a tiresome ecclesiastical history (with the exception of Mrs. Among the Eskimo of Greenland, it seems, there is a regular performance in which the aspiring “funny men” compete for popular favour. This can only be known in the first instance by a consciousness of what passes in our own minds. It makes the attitude a highly artificial one, and one which it is exceedingly difficult to maintain for a long period. So we may sometimes see persons look foolish enough on entering a party, or returning a salutation, who instantly feel themselves at home, and recover all their self-possession, as soon as any of that sort of conversation begins from which nine-tenths of the company retire in the extremest trepidation, lest they should betray their ignorance or incapacity. I am not proposing plans, here or elsewhere, to perform the addition of plus and minus quantities that is so easy in pure algebra; I am merely pointing out their existence. In the case of the music the sounds may be made with the voice, or with an instrument or with one or several of both at once, but this is only an apparent complication and does not affect the principle. I should not follow his advice, however, without giving everyone a fair chance. In the Greek there are five cases in each of the three numbers, consequently fifteen in all. The horrors which are supposed to haunt the bed of the murderer, the ghosts which superstition imagines rise from their graves to demand vengeance upon those who brought them to an untimely end, all take their origin from this natural sympathy with the imaginary resentment of the slain. Habit and experience have taught me to do this so easily and so readily, that I am scarce sensible that I do it; and a man must be, in some measure, acquainted with the philosophy of vision, before he can be thoroughly convinced, how little those distant objects would appear to the eye, if the imagination, from a knowledge of their real magnitudes, did not swell and dilate them. They retired silently to their cabins, and when, three days later, Pitale-Sharu returned to the village, no man challenged his action. That the discretion lodged in the tribunals was habitually and frightfully abused is only too evident, when von Rosbach deems it necessary to reprove, as a common error of the judges of his time, the idea that the use of torture was a matter altogether dependent upon their pleasure, “as though nature had created the bodies of prisoners for them to lacerate at will.”[1744] Thus it was an acknowledged rule that when guilt could be satisfactorily proved by witnesses, torture was not admissible;[1745] yet Damhouder feels it necessary to condemn the practice of some judges, who, after conviction by sufficient evidence, were in the habit of torturing the convict, and boasted that they never pronounced sentence of death without having first extorted a confession.[1746] Moreover, the practice was continued which we have seen habitual in the Chatelet of Paris in the fourteenth century, whereby, after a man had been duly convicted of a capital crime, he was tortured to extract confessions of any other offences of which he might be guilty;[1747] and as late as 1764, Beccaria lifts his voice against it as a still existing abuse, which he well qualifies as senseless curiosity, impertinent in the wantonness of its cruelty.[1748] Martin Bernhardi, writing in 1705, asserts that this torture after confession and conviction was also resorted to in order to prevent the convict from appealing from the sentence.[1749] So, although a man who freely confessed a crime could not be tortured, according to the general principle of the law, still, if in his confession he adduced mitigating circumstances, he could be tortured in order to force him to withdraw them;[1750] and, moreover, if he were suspected of having accomplices and refused to name them, he could be tortured as in the _question prealable_ of the French courts.[1751] Yet the accusation thus obtained was held to be of so little value that it only warranted the arrest of the parties incriminated, who could not legally be tortured without further evidence.[1752] In the face of all this it seems like jesting mockery to find these grim legists tenderly suggesting that the prisoner should be tortured only in the morning lest his health should suffer by subjecting him to the question after a full meal.[1753] If the practice of the criminal courts had been devised with the purpose of working injustice under the sacred name of law it could scarce have been different. Brett’s in Cleveland or Mr. As one truth, they said, could not be more true, nor one falsehood more false than another; so an honourable action could not be more honourable, nor a shameful one more shameful than another. They are then apt to interfere in the regulation of methods rather than to require results and afterward ascertain whether and in what degree these results have been reached. The case of the man with the wooden {132} leg is an obvious example of this. Lothair, nevertheless, married his concubine Waldrada, and for ten years the whole of Europe was occupied with the degrading details of the quarrel, council after council assembling to consider the subject, and the thunders of Rome being freely employed. But if this analogy holds with respect to secondary and artificial motives which are not in their own nature allied to action, surely it must hold much more with respect to the direct, original motives themselves, the ideas of good and evil, where the power inheres in the very nature of the object. With regard to language, this is obvious. Thus most libraries display without hesitation advertisements of free courses of lectures english 100 essay examples regents critical lens and the like. There were altogether about half a dozen of these, with staffs varying in number perhaps from five to forty or fifty persons. It is important, therefore, as I have said, to know, when standardization is being carried out, the limits of its advisability and the conditions under which it becomes useless or injurious. A girl reading a first love letter from the man whom her heart has chosen will be glad, and will grow gladder by leaps and bounds. These secure alarmists and dreaming guardians of the state are like superannuated watchmen enclosed in a sentry-box, that never hear ‘when thieves break through and steal.’ They put an oil-skin over their heads, that the dust raised by the passions and interests of the countless, ever-moving multitude, may not annoy or disturb the clearness of their vision. Into _thy_ darkened dwelling, my beloved, Some night would I walk, would I walk. When she came to me, for she had been in various places previous to this period, she was in a state of religious melancholia. In the comedy of the Restoration, we are told, “no measure is kept in pouring contempt on the mushroom growths of yesterday, the knights of recent creation”.[248] Something of this impression of the incongruously new is produced for a moment even in the case of a well-earned rise in the social scale. when angry storms break forth, And wake the waters into wrath; Ah! Thus the Wisigothic laws, as we have them, are not laws of race, like the other Barbarian codes, but territorial laws carefully digested for a whole nation by men conversant alike with the Roman and with their own ancestral jurisprudence. They took their playful revenge by making a haycock over their tyrant and shouting: “Get along, white man! Some again would limit the use of a library to students, or at all events to those who do not care to withdraw books for home use. Passing by the comic directions of pictorial art, including the highly developed process of modern political and other caricature, the great _role_ in stimulating men’s laughing susceptibilities falls to literature, and pre-eminently to dramatic literature and its interpreter, the stage. Yet legists who had been trained in the old school could not admit the soundness of modern ideas, and in the greater part of Germany the theories which resulted in the use of torture continued to prevail. Pray, tell me, is it not their having applied this epithet to some of your favourite speculations, that has excited this sudden burst of spleen against them? Thus, if a small quantity of Fire was mixed with a great quantity of Air, the moisture and moderate warmth of the one entirely surmounted and changed into their own essence the intense heat and dryness of the other; and the whole aggregate became Air. Halloran, in his practical observations on Insanity, says,—“Chronic insanity is that form of the disease, which, having passed through the acute and convalescent stages, has assumed the more permanent character, and is known by the frequent exacerbation of the original accession; also, finally, under circumstances of less violence, and with symptoms subacute in relation to the primary affection.” He adds,—“There are few Practioners of the most ordinary discernment, who will not feel themselves disposed to acknowledge that cases of insanity, precisely of this form, compose the greater majority of those committed to their care.” He further says,—“That these paroxysms are for the most part periodical in their approach; for though of shorter duration, they continue pertinaciously unyielding.” From the observations which I have to suggest, it will be seen, that I conceive in some instances, in opposition to Dr. To see how apparent this is we have but to remember the English, “I like him,” _i. You cannot go out into the desert with watering-pot and raise strawberries or asparagus. It is remarkable that the last interval of convalescence, commencing about five years ago, continued for more than three years, which I attribute to the absence of causes of irritation, more delicate and attentive treatment, and constant resources of various amusements. The belief even extended to the dominant Turks who, in 1857 at Trebinje, compelled the Christians to bring all their women to the river and cast them in. Preux wonders at the rash mortal who had dared to trace the features of his Julia; and accuses him english 100 essay examples regents critical lens of insensibility without reason. A working jeweller can perceive slight distinctions of surface, and make the smallest incisions in the hardest substances from mere practice: a woollen-draper perceives the different degrees of the fineness in cloth, on the same principle; a watchmaker will insert a great bony fist, and perform the nicest operations among the springs and wheels of a complicated and curious machinery, where the soft delicate hand of a woman or a child would make nothing but blunders. These nations are the ancient Egyptians, the ancient Aryans, and the Aztecs or Nahua of Central Mexico. That bodily pain and pleasure, therefore, were always the natural objects of desire and aversion, was, he thought, abundantly evident. It is hardly an exaggeration to say that the whole plot of one of these comedies consists in the showing up of the grotesque unsuitability of the comic character to its environment. Neither is our deference to the inclinations founded chiefly, or altogether, upon a regard to the utility of such submission, and to the order of society, which is best supported by it. This contemptuous expression was an effusion of spleen and impatience at the idea that there should be any who preferred Wordsworth’s descriptions of a daisy or a linnet’s nest to his _auctioneer_-poetry about curtains, and palls, and sceptres, and precious stones: but had Wordsworth, in addition to his original sin of simplicity and true genius, been a popular writer, his contempt would have turned into hatred. Encourage this desire; afford him every means to facilitate the acquisition; and do not take too much offence, although he should sometimes assume the air of having attained it a little before the time. Pedro acceded to the request and promised to preside, provided there was due cause for a judicial duel and that the arms were agreed upon in advance, and he sent the combatants safe-conducts to come to Aragon. The original sin of being what he is, renders his good works and most meritorious efforts null and void. _No._ 7.—_Admitted_ 1792. They both continue to dwell in the houses of their respective fathers, and the open cohabitation of the two sexes, which is permitted without blame in all other countries, is here considered as the most indecent and unmanly sensuality. Present, I forget, _asqui chita uringera_. As stupid men are generally less diverted from an object which once engages their attention, than men of greater capacity; so it is with these poor automata; if the first difficulty be but once overcome, that of acquiring the habit of working, there is no fear; but they will proceed in it more steadily than those who feel that they have a right to consult their own choice. The vogue for mysticism in poetry, art, and religion reflects this love of symbolism. He is grieved at the thought of it; regrets the unhappy effects of his own conduct, and feels at the same time that they have rendered him the proper object of the resentment and indignation of mankind, and of what is the natural consequence of resentment, vengeance and punishment. The enthusiasts of old did all they could to strike the present existence from under our feet to give us another—to annihilate our natural affections and worldly vanities, so as to conform us to the likeness of God: the modern sciolists offer us Utopia in lieu of our actual enjoyments; for warm flesh and blood would give us a head of clay and a heart of steel, and conform us to their own likeness—‘a consummation not very devoutly to be wished!’ Where is the use of getting rid of the trammels of superstition and slavery, if we are immediately to be handed over to these new ferrets and inspectors of a _Police-Philosophy_; who pay domiciliary visits to the human mind, catechise an expression, impale a sentiment, put every enjoyment to the rack, leave you not a moment’s ease or respite, and imprison all the faculties in a round of cant-phrases—the Shibboleth of a party? How many ways are there, in which our peace may be assailed, besides actual want!